News & Discussions

How Tubes and IV Lines Are Used During Cancer Treatment

American Cancer Society | Original American Cancer Society Article Here. | Tubes and intravenous, or IV, lines allow liquid medicines, fluids, and even nourishment to flow into the body. See Managing Treatment at Home for more on tubes and IV lines. Intravenous (IV)...

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Having an IV

Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters | Original CHKD Article Here. | What is an "IV"? "IV" stands for "intravenous," which means inside the vein. Fluids and medicines are often given into the veins through a catheter (a hollow plastic tube). Once the catheter...

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Understanding IV Fluids: What’s in the Bag?

By: Sue Carrington | Quick read: IVs deliver various fluids from a bag through a tube placed in the body including saline, D5W and electrolytes. Saline is most common, a mixture of water and salt - similar to what’s naturally in your body. D5W, a sugar solution,...

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Patient Spotlight – Caitlin King

By Heather Michon | Caitlin King only got to hold her newborn twin girls for a few precious moments before they were whisked off to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). That’s where their journey began. Born at 32 weeks and six days, Abbie May and Gardner Grace...

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IV 101: Learn the Basics About IV Therapy

By: Ryan MacArthur | Quick read: 80% of U.S. hospital patients receive an IV. IVs were first used to treat dehydration, a common usage still today. The main types are peripheral IVs, central lines and midline catheters. Like any procedure, there are complications to...

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Infusing Health: The Most Common IV Infusion Procedures

By: Sue Carrington | Quick read: Intravenous (IV) infusions are a common way to absorb medicine, fluid and nutrients into your system quickly. A thin plastic tube called a catheter is placed in the vein and connects to an IV bag containing fluids. The most common IV...

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The 3 Different Types of IVs

By: Ryan MacArthur | Quick read: Medication, fluid or blood can be delivered into the bloodstream using three different types of IVs: peripheral IVs, central lines or midline catheters. Peripheral IVs are most common, placed short term. Central Lines are typically...

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Common IV Complications: What Can Go Wrong?

By: Ryan MacArthur | Quick read: While IVs are common, they’re not without risks. Common IV complications include infiltrations, extravasations, hematomas, phlebitis and air embolisms. Infiltrations, extravasations and hematomas occur when fluid leaks into the...

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Anxiety About IVs? Tips From a Fellow Patient

WebMD; Heather Original WebMD Article Here. I used to hate needles. I was completely phobic. I dreaded annual flu shots and almost had a nervous breakdown when I had my first IV. Alas, needles—and IVs—became a regular part of my life once I entered cancer treatment....

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