News & Discussions

Mom 101: Talking to Your Child About IVs

By: Sue Carrington | Quick read: It’s important to explain to your child what an IV is and why they’re getting one before a procedure takes place. It can be helpful to give a step-by-step overview of what will happen, including what the doctor/nurse will be doing and...

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IVs: Fact vs. Fiction

By: Ryan MacArthur | Quick read: IVs aren’t perfect and can fail like any other medical procedure. IV placement isn’t supposed to be painful, but it depends on the patient. After IV placement, the needle is removed, leaving just the cannula in the vein. There are...

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IV Red Flags: Learn When to Speak Up

By: Heather Michon | Quick read: While your medical team will keep an eye on your IV for signs of complications, patients can take a more active role by knowing the IV red flags to look for. If you notice signs of puffiness, tenderness or blanching, you should alert a...

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Kidney Disease and IVs: Managing the Complications

By Sue Carrington | Quick read: Kidneys serve multiple functions including waste removal, fluid balance, regulation of salts and minerals, and controlling blood pressure + red blood cell production. Kidney failure can lead to life-threatening complications such as...

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Chemotherapy: Types, uses, and adverse effects

By: Christian Nordqvist | Medical News Today Read the Original Medical News Today Article Here. Chemotherapy is a widely used treatment for cancer. It is the name commonly given to drugs that prevent cancer cells from dividing and growing by killing dividing cells. A...

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Understanding Veins and Arteries: What’s the Difference?

By: Sue Carrington | Quick read: The body has two types of blood vessels: veins and arteries. Arteries carry blood away from the heart to our cells. Veins carry blood to the heart from the rest of the body. IVs are placed in veins, not arteries, allowing the...

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Are Certain Patients at a Higher Risk of IV Failure?

By: Ryan MacArthur | Quick read: The current IV failure rate reaches up to 50%, meaning a significant number of patients will experience some type of IV failure. Factors like age, nutrition, medical history and body size may play a role in the likelihood of...

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