IV Risks

IV risks

IV Risks: Infiltrations, Extravasations and Phlebitis

Intravenous (IV) therapy is one of the most common hospital procedures, with 80% of U.S. hospital patients receiving an IV at some point during their care. Despite how common IV therapy is, IVs currently have a 50% failure rate.* Each type of IV failure brings IV risks that all patients should be aware of. Some of the most common types of IV failure include infiltrations, extravasations and phlebitis.

Infiltrations

Infiltrations are responsible for 23% of IV failures.* An infiltration occurs when fluid or medication leaks into the tissue surrounding the vein. Every infiltration is also a medication dosing error, meaning patients do not receive the full amount of the medication they need.

Patients may experience pain, discomfort, or complications like nerve damage and amputation.

Learn more about how infiltration occurs by watching our Causes of Infiltration video.

Extravasations

Extravasations are the infiltration of a blistering agent. This occurs when potentially-damaging medications, known as vesicants, leak into the tissue around the site of the infusion. When leaked, vesicants like chemotherapy drugs can cause pain at the IV site and permanent harm such as the destruction of tissue.

Extravasations are also medication dosing errors, meaning patients do not receive the full amount of the medication they need. Patients may experience pain, discomfort, or complications like nerve damage and amputation.

Phlebitis

Phlebitis is the inflammation of the vein, most commonly associated with IV placement on the back of the hand. It may occur in patients whose IV has been in place for several days.

Symptoms include swelling, warmth at the IV site and, in rare cases, a fever.

To learn more about potential IV risks, check out IV Complications: What Can Go Wrong?

 

*Accepted, but unacceptable: peripheral IV catheter failure: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25871866 

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